Design by A Bird in Hand Blog Designs. Powered by Blogger.
Sharing Sunday MLK Resources from Ideas By Jivey
The authors of The Primary Peach are bringing you some exciting resources to use in February, and make your planning life easier! I am sharing some ideas to use with the big kids and integrate some Valentine's Day fun in the mix. The best part: almost all of them are freebies or ideas from blog posts! Click on any of the images below to download the PDF. Once you are on the PDF, click around on all of the images to visit the resources!

Valentine's Day for Big Kids with Ideas By Jivey

Valentine's Day for Big Kids with Ideas By Jivey

Valentine's Day for Big Kids with Ideas By Jivey

Head over to The Primary Peach for more Sharing Sunday posts!

One of my all-time favorite books to use when teaching poetry is Love That Dog by Sharon Creech, but you CAN'T just read it. For students to really "get" what the boy is talking about in the book, students have to first know the poems that Ms. Stretchberry is making him read. What better way for students to connect with a character than to have them also learn about the same poems? I found that my boys actually ended up liking our poetry unit more than my girls because many thought like Jack: "boys don't write poetry."
Use Poetry to Teach Close Reading Strategies with Ideas By Jivey

Before I would ever open the book, we would do some close reading with the poem, The Red Wheelbarrow by William Carlos Williams, which is a great one for visualization. It's also super short and pretty easy to analyze.

"Now can we start reading it?"

Nope. The book would remain on the tray of my board, taunting them. 

The next day, we would do some close reading with the poem, Stopping By The Woods On A Snowy Evening by Robert Frost. This blog post will walk you through how I would teach them to do close reading with a poem... and be sure to stick around for a BONUS at the end!

Use Poetry to Teach Close Reading Strategies with Ideas By Jivey

I liked to use different colored pens as I went through the steps so my students could see how my thinking progressed. This is a great technique when you can display your "live" work on the board with a document camera.

First, I would label stanzas and rhyme scheme. You can also number the verses for the purpose of future discussions, but since this one is pretty short (and the verses are not very wordy), I would just have students refer to the stanza they are talking about when discussing.
Use Poetry to Teach Close Reading Strategies with Ideas By Jivey

Next, you want students to "get the gist" of the poem. Students will annotate their initial thoughts during the first read. (Check this post for a great annotation bookmark students can use as a reminder!) 

If this is the first time you are close reading a poem together, I would definitely do it "think aloud" style. Read it aloud, and as you come across things that "jump out" to you (or that you want to jump out to students), stop and talk about your thoughts as you jot them down. For example, the first stanza talks about the woods being owned by someone who doesn't live there. I would underline and annotate this thought as I read to them. After going through the entire poem this way, write a short summary: the gist.
Use Poetry to Teach Close Reading Strategies with Ideas By Jivey

Once students have an understanding of the poem, we want them to go even deeper and try to understand what is happening in the poem, and what the author wants to convey. It's important to provide a purpose for this read. Read the poem aloud to them again, and this time, focus on answers to the question: "Why does the horse think the stop is a mistake?"
Use Poetry to Teach Close Reading Strategies with Ideas By Jivey

I would point out the word "stopping" means that they had been moving, or traveling. I would also point out that there is no farmhouse, and they are basically in the middle of nowhere. This would probably confuse the horse since he most likely is used to only stopping for food or shelter when traveling, or when they arrive home. He shakes his bells to get his owner's attention. 

I would also start a discussion about promises- who do you make promises to? (Most will likely reply to people they love or care about.) This will lead to a great new discussion, where do you think they are going in the poem?

Finally, the third read could be done on their own, but again, if this is the first time you are doing this with your students, I would still walk them through the last step. To connect to this poem, students can visualize it. I like to mark words that stand out to me that help me visualize.
Use Poetry to Teach Close Reading Strategies with Ideas By Jivey

You could do this all in one day, or stretch it over a couple days. And of course, your students are STILL WAITING for you to start reading Love That Dog! Now that you've read these two poems, you'll at least be able to start the book. 

To make sure that the students know the poems Jack is referring to throughout the book, look ahead and see when it is necessary to analyze a new poem! 

If you want to use this poem in your room, either with Love That Dog or without, you can get the lesson you've seen in this post for free here!


You can also get a full pack of lessons just like this
to give you a poem for every month of the year!



Enjoy!

Sharing Sunday MLK Resources from Ideas By Jivey
The authors of The Primary Peach are back again for January to make your life easier and help you plan! I am sharing some fabulous activities for Martin Luther King, Jr with ideas for ALL grades! The best part: almost all of them are freebies or ideas from blog posts! Click on any of the images below to download the PDF. Once you are on the PDF, click around on all of the images to visit the resources!

Here are some great ideas for K-2:
Sharing Sunday MLK Resources from Ideas By Jivey
Sharing Sunday MLK Resources from Ideas By Jivey
 Here are some great writing ideas for any grade:
Sharing Sunday MLK Resources from Ideas By Jivey
 And here are some ideas for grades 3 and up, including an exclusive freebie from me:
Sharing Sunday MLK Resources from Ideas By Jivey
Sharing Sunday MLK Resources from Ideas By Jivey
Sharing Sunday MLK Resources from Ideas By Jivey
Head over to The Primary Peach for more Sharing Sunday posts! You can also check out more MLK resources with Carla at Comprehension Connection!

Hey, my tired, worn-out, ready-for-Winter-Break teacher friends!

Several of my bloggy buddies have teamed up to bring you some relief! We know you're ready for the break, so we are bringing you some merry tips AND some presents to make the last few days bright and help you get to the end! :)
Merry and Bright with Ideas By Jivey
My Merry Tip is a fun way to help manage behavior. We all know the natives tend to get restless this time of year... the excitement of the holidays, the breaks in routines with programs, and FINALS (blech!) tend to make some students go, well... crazy!

I think the best way for students to really understand science and social studies concepts is to also integrate it into reading and writing. I have many articles and passages that you can use to integrate your science and social studies skills into your language arts time.
Interactive Notes Left Brain - Right Brain With Ideas by Jivey.


Interactive notetaking is really just another form of close reading and annotating. It is a genius way of helping science and social studies content "sink in" and the kids really enjoy it! (Anything is better than reading the textbook, anyway!)

If you googled "interactive notes," you would find that there are all different types of strategies. I am going to share the one that has worked for me in my classroom. In my room, we use colored pencils to key our paragraphs, then we use those same colors to write phrases and draw pictures that represent the important information learned in a passage. Colored pencils work best- no bleeding markers, and no fat, dull crayons.

I love this graphic to help explain the next part of interactive notes. 
Interactive Notes Left Brain - Right Brain With Ideas by Jivey.
Because the left brain is in charge of the right side, and the right brain is in charge of the left side, any passage you give them will be glued on the right side of the notebook (the accurate control) and all of their interpretations of the passage will be done on the left side of the notebook (creative). 
Interactive Notes Left Brain - Right Brain With Ideas by Jivey.
As you can see, each paragraph gets its own color, and then all of the work that is done for that paragraph will be done in that color- this helps them connect to each paragraph, and it's also a great study tool!

Once students have finished their notes, they should be able to read back what they have learned. Allow the students to sit with a partner and talk in complete sentences to summarize the notes they have drawn and written on the left side of their notebook.
Interactive Notes Left Brain - Right Brain With Ideas by Jivey.
At home, they can do the same! They can fold their notebook in half so that they can see their notes and a parent or older sibling can see the article. As the student summarizes their notes- the person on the other side of the notebook should be able to follow along in the article, so they know if the child is not understanding.
Today's Planning Present is a passage and questions about Sacagawea:
Interactive Notes Planning Present With Ideas by Jivey.
Interactive Notes Planning Present With Ideas by Jivey

I hope this planning present will help you effectively integrate social studies into reading! Don't forget to head over to Teaching to Inspire with Jennifer Findley for another planning present!

For more Social Studies Resources and ideas, follow my Pinterest board!

Math Workshop truly changed the way I reach students for the BETTER. Being able to work with students on their level in a small group helps me not only see their thinking, but it also prevents students from sitting through an entire lesson "lost."

While you are working with a small group, the rest of the class is working in stations. I despise mindless busy work stations. I don't want my students doing "hush activities." I want them to truly be reviewing skills and learning from each other through games and partner activities. (You can find all of my math stations here!) That requires a lot of training in the beginning of the school year (or whenever you decide to start a workshop) because, of course, what do students want to do when they get together? TALK! 
Establishing the routine is so important, and I can't stress this word enough: MODEL MODEL MODEL! You have to really show students what it is you expect from them. That means when you first start Math Workshop, you can't start groups right away. It might even be three weeks before you pull a group. You have to be a part of the stations, and of course, walk around and make sure students are on task. But you also want to set a routine for when you aren't able to monitor every minute... you want to teach students to be accountable for their learning. Which leads me to today's planning present!
Today's Planning Present is a student accountability report:
Math Workshop Student Accountability Report With Ideas by Jivey
This page is from the complete Launching Math Workshop Guide.

I first got this idea a few years ago from a fellow 4th grade teammate, and it changed the way my stations ran- truly! Copy this sheet front and back to have room for all your stations and even a small group slot if you'd like. Provide 5-10 minutes at the end of each workshop to allow them to write, and then also share out. Students must describe their learning using math language. I think it is important for students to reflect on what they learned each day. Not only does it help me see what they did or did not understand, but they also know I expect them to tell me about what they have done and learned, so they can’t just mess around the entire station time. Often times, this is when their group will tattle on another member too- ha!!

Students must be trained with this part of workshop, too. When you are part of the stations as you set up Math Workshop, point out some things they might want to reflect on at the end. And then of course, have your own reflection page on a poster or on the SMART Board and show the students what you expect to be written each day (complete sentences, math language, etc.). This simple task will allow your students to become such great math thinkers, and it will help hold students accountable for their learning!
Math Workshop Student Accountability Report With Ideas by Jivey
I hope this planning present will help you implement Math Workshop effectively in your classroom. Don't forget to head over to Jennifer's blog, Teaching to Inspire, for another planning present!

For more Math Resources and ideas, follow my Pinterest board!
Do you loathe grammar? I bet I know why. You are tired of drill and kill style grammar teaching. Or you wish students would quit guessing what the error MIGHT be in your DOL or DGP (or any other acronym that might represent your grammar program) sentence of the day, because it doesn't carry over into their writing anyway.

Have no fear! Jivey is here! :) Stop showing students sentences full of mistakes. Start using mentor sentences from your favorite mentor texts that you already use to teach other skills, and your students will actually be EXCITED for grammar and writing instruction!
The idea of mentor sentences across all grades is for students to notice what makes it a great sentence, and then carry those great things over into their writing. Most teachers will agree, style and conventions are the two areas that are the most difficult to teach and the two areas that usually suffer in student writing. Mentor sentences help you teach these two domains in a way that is fun for the students AND you! Each day, students will do something a little different with the sentence. Each week, students will focus on one or two skills, but they will still be exposed to several skills, many of which they have already learned from previous mentor sentences, so the spiral learning really makes an impact. 
 
Today's Planning Present is a mentor sentence lesson from the mentor text, Owl Moon by Jane Yolen. 
Owl Moon Mentor Sentence Lesson With Ideas by Jivey.
**disclaimer** Today, I am going to give you the "CliffsNotes" version of implementing mentor sentences. I have a TON of resources, including videos, that you can read and watch here, and detailed instructions are also provided in Unit 1 of all of my mentor sentence packs. You will be able to implement the lesson I'm including using just this blog post, but please note, consistency of using mentor sentences is what truly makes a difference in your students' writing and understanding of grammar. The routine and repetition produces fabulous student authors!**

Day One: After reading the text, show the students the mentor sentence. 
Owl Moon Mentor Sentence Lesson With Ideas by Jivey.
Ask students what they notice about the sentence that makes it a great one. If this is your first mentor sentence lesson with your students, you may need to prompt them more with questions like, "What type of sentence is this? What interesting words did the author use? Is there any figurative language? What did the owl do?" 
Owl Moon Mentor Sentence Lesson With Ideas by Jivey.
Students can make a list in their notebook of things they notice, and you should also make a list of things they noticed on chart paper. The focus skills are: simple sentence with compound predicate and possessive pronouns. You'll want to make sure students recognize these two things if they didn't already "notice" them. The simile is also a great thing to point out. Anything they missed on their own, they can add to their list as you write them on your chart. 

Day Two: Students should rewrite the sentence, skipping lines in between, and label the parts of speech they know. The idea behind this is to help them notice how words work together to make effective sentences. It is NOT necessary to label every word, especially in the beginning. If this is your first time doing mentor sentences, you might only want to label nouns, verbs, and the possessive pronoun to cover the focus skills. 
Owl Moon Mentor Sentence Lesson With Ideas by Jivey. 
If you feel the students are ready to label more, go for it!  
Owl Moon Mentor Sentence Lesson With Ideas by Jivey.
You will also want to take some time to focus on the skills of the week. This would be a great time to pull out a writing piece the students have been working on and have them practice using compound predicates. Point out the way the mentor sentence was formed and ask them to try it. You can also have students look for possessive pronouns in their own reading and write the sentence they found it in on a sticky note to share later. (I also have supplemental interactive notebook activities in my store that you can use as mini-lessons, which are aligned with the mentor sentence lessons.)

Day Three: Students will revise the sentence. YES- even published sentences can be revised! This not only helps students' revision skills, but it also shows them they are never "done." I always show students my own revision of the mentor sentence so students can identify what was changed. It also gives them an idea of what they can do.
Owl Moon Mentor Sentence Lesson With Ideas by Jivey.

Day Four: Students will imitate the sentence. It's not often students are allowed to write about any topic, so they get very excited about imitating. The only thing they MUST do as part of their imitation is to keep the structure of the sentence the same. For this sentence, students should definitely have a compound predicate and a simile. 
Owl Moon Mentor Sentence Lesson With Ideas by Jivey.
Choose a few sentences to celebrate- give the students sentence strips to write their sentence and hang in the classroom. You'll be amazed at the style that comes out of your students! Students should also continue practicing the structure of the mentor sentence. After several weeks of showing them that you expect them to use their mentor sentences to help them with their own writing pieces, you'll find that students pull out their mentor sentence notebook without you even asking them!

Day Five: Assess the students' understanding of the focus skills. A weekly quiz is included with the mentor sentence lessons. You might choose to take it for a grade, or you might use it as a formative assessment to see who still needs help. The mentor sentence DOES have errors because students still need to be able to recognize when there are mistakes... but they have seen and worked with the sentence all week so they SHOULD recognize the mistakes! It isn't like DOL, where they have never seen the sentence before and often don't know what would be wrong. 

Owl Moon Mentor Sentence Lesson With Ideas by Jivey.
I hope this planning present will help you teach grammar and writing style effectively in your classroom. Don't forget to head over to Jennifer's blog, Teaching to Inspire, for another planning present!

For more Mentor Sentences Resources and ideas, follow my Pinterest board!

Back to Top