November 2015 - Ideas By Jivey: For the Classroom
Here comes December! Oh my goodness, how is the year almost over?? The authors of The Primary Peach are back again this month to make your life easier and help you plan for these crazy few weeks before Winter Break! I am sharing some fabulous activities with a snow globe theme- great for grades 1-3. The best part: almost all of them are freebies or ideas from blog posts! Click on any of the images below to download the PDF. Once you are on the PDF, click around on all of the images to visit the resources!

Head over to The Primary Peach for more Sharing Sunday posts!






Hello and welcome to the second annual Winter Wonderland link up! At the bottom of all of The Reading Crew's posts, there is a "map" of the blogs so you can hop through them all at once, visit some today and some later in the week, or see what best matches your literacy needs. 

On each blog, we will be sharing a mentor text lesson using the book we've chosen. The lesson will be modeling a reading skill (comprehension or writing typically, but some at the primary level may target vocabulary, fluency, or word building). The materials that are shared may be forever freebies or may be free for a limited time. Please take note of this as you visit the blogs. 

Again, we welcome you to our blogs and wish you and yours a wonderful holiday season.
Reading In A Winter Wonderland with Ideas by Jivey.
The Snow Globe Family is one of my very favorite books because it reminds me of that anticipation of a coming snow! Here in Georgia, we don't get snow much (and yes, it often shuts the state down) so anytime the "S-word" is in the forecast, I get very excited!
The Snow Globe Family is an adorable book by Jane O'Connor and illustrated by S.D. Schindler. It tells the story of TWO families- one that lives in a big house on a hill, as well as the family that lives INSIDE the snow globe sitting on their mantel! Everyone in the "big" family has forgotten about the snow globe - everyone except Baby...

Reading In A Winter Wonderland with Ideas by Jivey.
My activities are great for first, second, and third graders. There are many similarities between the two families, and that is what you will focus on in this lesson. Before reading, let the students know they should be looking and listening for things that are the same about the two families, either in the text or the illustrations. (There are several similarities!) 

Reading In A Winter Wonderland with Ideas by Jivey. One of the things they will notice right away, of course, is how tiny the snow globe family is. I suggest completing the first activity while you read the book the first time. This activity asks the students to note the details (evidence) the author gives to show that the snow globe family is small. This can be done together as you read on a chart, or depending on your students, you might give them the activity page to fill in as you read. The author does a great job describing how small things are in the snow globe, such as their footprints being smaller than sprinkles. After reading the story, either the same day or the next day, complete the Venn diagram to compare the snow globe family and the big family, this time focusing on more than just the size of them. You might want to re-read the story for this activity, or thumb through and show them certain pages, but I would first see what they remember on their own!

Reading In A Winter Wonderland with Ideas by Jivey.
This book is perfect to extend into your writing time, too! Students can imagine they were in a snow globe and draw a scene, which would make a great story starter. I have included a page they can use to draw their scene, as well as a lined writing prompt page.


Reading In A Winter Wonderland with Ideas by Jivey. You can also turn this writing activity into an adorable craft! Check out my blog post to see what I did in my fourth grade classroom, which you can easily do in any grade! I took pictures of the students pretending to be in their snow globe. I also traced around a small plastic (clear) plate on construction paper and students illustrated the inside of the circle, complete with their photograph. We dropped some fake snow and glitter flakes (and even some snowflake confetti) onto their illustration, then I hot glued the plate on to the paper for them. The "snow" moved freely around under the plate. My students absolutely loved this project, and it made their writing some of the best they had done all year!
Reading In A Winter Wonderland with Ideas by Jivey.
This forever freebie is exclusive to my blog readers only- 
it will not be in my TPT store. 
Of course, you know me! I can't integrate this book into reading and writing and leave out GRAMMAR! :o) You can also get this mentor sentence lesson for free for this book. The focus skill is adjectives. 
Reading In A Winter Wonderland with Ideas by Jivey.

Pin for Later:
Reading In A Winter Wonderland Freebie with Ideas by Jivey.

If you want even more IN-DEPTH step-by-step help with implementing mentor sentences, check out my courses!








Hey friends! It's time to review the year and all the bright ideas that have been shared!
But first, here is a new bright idea for you:
With Ideas by Jivey
Crates and plastic book bins! When I was in the classroom, my students were not allowed to put ANY library books (mine or the media center's) in their desks. I didn't want them getting torn and messed up... I mean, you have seen the way students shove things in there, right? Each student got their own book bin that always went back in the same place in or on the crate, and this book bin held their library books, as well as their reading notebook and reading folder. You'll notice the crates are right by their tables too- this way, if they have extra time when an assignment is done, they can easily get their book without distracting others walking around the room. When it was time for reading workshop, they had everything they needed in one place to take with them to their book nooks or the guided reading table! :)

I have a few in the round up, too- check them out by clicking on the images below if you missed them (or need a refresher!):
With Ideas by Jivey




With Ideas by Jivey
Creating Maps to Review the Year
With Ideas by Jivey
Fun Seed Idea Activity
With Ideas by Jivey
If you enjoyed these bright ideas, please consider joining me on Facebook, Instagram, or my TPT Store for more great ideas.

For more bright ideas from other bloggers, please browse through the link-up below and choose a topic/grade level that interests you. Thanks for visiting!


I know there is a lot of controversy about the Common Core, and that is not what I'm here to discuss. If you are a teacher, whether you are for or against CCSS, you have to teach the standards! So I am here to (hopefully) make your life a little easier. :)


The division area model can seem difficult to teach because it's NEW to so many, but actually, I found my students to be MUCH more successful with it than the traditional long division algorithm.

>>>Why?<<<

Well, first of all, students have been working on multiplication facts for about a year by the time you get to division in 4th grade (counting third grade practice, and constant practice the first part of fourth grade). This method makes them think in a "multiplication problem with a missing product" kind of way.

Second, the area model breaks down a "hard" division problem into a few easier ones. 

Third, it helps them SEE what they are actually dividing (hundreds, tens, and ones), unlike the traditional algorithm. 

And fourth, it allows them to "check" themselves much easier.

>>>How do I do it?<<<

The size of your model, or number of "boxes" will be determined by your dividend- I will be demonstrating with a 3-digit dividend, but you can absolutely use this (and should!) with 2-digit, 4-digit, and so on. 
Area Models With Ideas by Jivey
First, let's look at what the students will be doing with manipulatives. It's important to start with concrete models first before moving to the more abstract. We are going to divide 834 by 3. We start in the hundreds. We can only put two hundreds into three groups to divide evenly.
Area Models With Ideas by Jivey
That means we need to slide the "remainders" over to the tens place, but we also need to trade those two hundreds for twenty tens to be able to make groups.
Area Models With Ideas by Jivey
Now, we can put seven tens into three groups to divide evenly.
Area Models With Ideas by Jivey
So again, we slide those remainders over, this time to the ones... so those two extra tens should now be traded for twenty ones.
Area Models With Ideas by Jivey
And of course, we can divide 24 into three equal groups by putting eight in each group!
Area Models With Ideas by Jivey
By adding up the numbers across the top, you get your quotient!
278!

Now for the more abstract model... using numbers. Same idea as with manipulatives! You are only dividing the hundreds first, so 3 x ___ = a number close to 8?
Area Models With Ideas by Jivey
Just to show you what might happen (and probably will), here is a student who doesn't start off grouping correctly:
Area Models With Ideas by Jivey
The same could go if they said 300 could be in each group... when they go to subtract 900, they are going to see that 300 can't be correct! But luckily, this student figured out it was 200. :)
Area Models With Ideas by Jivey
Moving to the tens, same idea- I like to have the students "box" what they are going to be dividing. This way, they remember it is 23 tens, not just 3 tens.
Area Models With Ideas by Jivey
They will have that remainder of 24 to move over to the ones, which hopefully they can very easily answer 8x3=24! :)
Area Models With Ideas by Jivey
Finally, just like before, add up all those numbers across the top of the model to get your quotient!
Area Models With Ideas by Jivey

I like to give students this larger workmat (laminated) with a dry erase marker to help them do their work. Not only is it more fun, but of course, it is also easier to erase, and erase, and erase... :)
Area Models With Ideas by Jivey
You can find this activity (and many other division stations) in my Differentiated Division Stations for Math Workshop pack! I also have other math station sets in my store.

Check out these blog posts, too, on why to use Math Workshop and how to Manage Stations!

Follow my Math Workshop Pinterest Board for even more great ideas!

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